Emerging Scholar Workshops on Society and Astrobiology, CTI Princeton

Super excited about being in Princeton and taking part in the Questing for Life: Emerging Scholar Workshops on the Societal Implications of Astrobiology at the Center of Theological Inquiry, CTI.

Supported by a grant from the NASA Astrobiology Program and the Templeton Foundation, the 2016/2017 Center’s Inquiry on the Societal Implications of Astrobiology aims to engage the humanities, social sciences, philosophy, and theology with current science exploring the origins and extent of life in the universe.

The workshop Questing for Life: Emerging Scholar Workshops on the Societal Implications of Astrobiology (June 13-16, 2017) focuses on the joint contributions of the sciences and humanities.

More information about the event was published in the Fresh Thinking Magazine: Issue 1 (2018)

About the workshop

Astrobiology is the quest to understand the potential of the universe to harbor life beyond Earth. Societal understanding of life on Earth has always developed in dialogue with scientific investigations of its origin and evolution. Today, the science of astrobiology extends these investigations to include the possibility of life in the universe. As astrobiology develops and its discoveries become more widely known, scholars in the humanities and social sciences will have new opportunities to interpret the significance of these discoveries and deepen our understanding of life itself. These research workshops offer one such opportunity. Questing for Life is for emerging scholars who are open to this new angle of vision on perennial questions. Sample topics include the use of narratives in understanding life in space; historical studies of first encounters with other cultures and natural life on Earth; how literature and the arts shape expectations of life; ethical, philosophical, and theological implications of the quest; conceptual questions in defining life; theoretical problems in identifying life; the legal, environmental, political, and commercial issues in planetary protection; and the impact of astrobiology on views of nature for indigenous and world religions. CTI aims to foster a community of discussion that crosses traditional boundaries.

Klara’s Undergraduate Dissertation

Albína Dratvová: Life and Work – In Search of the Lost Cosmos is now available to download (PDF, Czech version).

My final year undergraduate project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor’s degree (Bc. of Liberal Arts and Humanities) to Charles Faculty of Humanities, University in Prague, 2005. The thesis ‘Albína Dratvová: Life and Work – In Search of the Lost Cosmos’ was supervised by PhDr. Lubica Gabriskova, CSc.

The two year research project into history of science, science and society, philosophy of science, biography and bibliography of Czech philosopher Dr Dratvova involved extensive study of archival data in the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague.
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The dissertation was later partially used as an introduction to a co-edited reprint of the actual diary entitled 'Albina Dratvova: Scientific Diary 1921-1961'. The book was edited by Klara Anna Capova, Libuse Heczkova, and Zuzana Lestinova and published in Prague by Academia in 2008.

Free preview and abstract is available from Academia Publishing (Czech only). For more information please see World Catalogue website. The book is available from the Library of Congress, Princeton University Library, British Library and National Library of the Czech Republic.

ISBN: 9788020016966 8020016961

CLNR Report on Electrical Vehicle Users

This report describes the CLNR (Customer-Led Network Revolution) trial which examined electric vehicles usage patterns and expected network loading in the event of large-scale take-up of electric vehicles.

The trial involved domestic customers who owned an electric vehicle and had access to a home charger, analysis being carried out by Durham University’s CLNR project engineering and social science teams. Observations are based on a semi-qualitative analysis of EV dataset collated from online survey, face to face interviews with householders enrolled in the CLNR project, and power monitoring data collected from households and electric vehicle (EV) chargers.

This CLNR project output is the largest socio-technical study of domestic EV charging in the UK.