Students’ Attitudes to Astrobiology poster presented at NASA AbSciCon 2017

The first poster entitled ‘Students’ Attitudes to Astrobiology. Attitudes towards scientific search for extraterrestrial life among Swedish high school and university students’ by Erik Persson, Klara Anna Capova, and Yuan will be presented later today at the AbSciCon 2017.

E-poster is available online: www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/abscicon2017/eposter/3156.pdf

Abstract

STUDENTS ATTITUDES TO ASTROBIOLOGY. ATTITUDES TOWARDS SCIENTIFIC SEARCH FOR EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL LIFE AMONG SWEDISH HIGH SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
Erik Persson1,2, Klara Anna Capova*3, and Yuan Li4,

1 Center of Theological Inquiry, Princeton, USA Email: erik.persson@fil.lu.se
2 The Pufendorf Institute for Advanced Studies, Lund University, Sweden
3 Department of Anthropology, Durham University, UK, Email: k.a.capova@durham.ac.uk
4 Department of Biology, Lund University, Sweden

The paper presents results of a recent study looking into the attitudes towards the scientific search for extra-terrestrial life among high school and university students in Sweden. The analysis has revealed that (a) the great majority of students believe that extra-terrestrial life exists; (b) most students regard searching for extra-terrestrial life to be fairly important; (c) very few students think that searching for extra-terrestrial life is something we should actively avoid; (d) the most common motive for assigning a high priority to search for extra-terrestrial life, is that it is interesting; and the most common motive for assigning a low priority is the opinion that such knowledge would not be practically useful or that the money would be better spent elsewhere; (e) most students do not think they are very well informed regarding the search for extra-terrestrial life. At the same time, however, a higher percentage of the students who judge themselves to be well informed also believe that extra-terrestrial life exists. We have also found some differences between sub-groups (men/women, high school students/university students and different fields of study), but the differences are with few exceptions small in comparison to the overall trends, and typically matters of degree rather than direction.

CLNR Report on Electrical Vehicle Users

This report describes the CLNR (Customer-Led Network Revolution) trial which examined electric vehicles usage patterns and expected network loading in the event of large-scale take-up of electric vehicles.

The trial involved domestic customers who owned an electric vehicle and had access to a home charger, analysis being carried out by Durham University’s CLNR project engineering and social science teams. Observations are based on a semi-qualitative analysis of EV dataset collated from online survey, face to face interviews with householders enrolled in the CLNR project, and power monitoring data collected from households and electric vehicle (EV) chargers.

This CLNR project output is the largest socio-technical study of domestic EV charging in the UK.