Should we stay or should we go …. to Mars?

I’ve always wanted to be an astronaut ever since I was in first grade. I’ve always wanted to have the same view of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon.

Yet, in the debate held at the Durham Union Society on Friday the 13th February 2015 I spoke against the motion “This House (as a student) would go to Mars.”

I belive that there are more aspects to be carefully thought through before ‘we’ make this step and send human beings on a one way trip to the red planet. My major concerns were not only related to unpredictable risks (technological, psychological, medical ..) but mainly to the commercial nature of Mars One enterprise.

Any thoughts …?

P.S.: Also, I think there is a thin red line between space exploration and space exploitation.

Klara’s Talk at a SETI Workshop

Would humans be able to decode information-rich signals from another planet? Could we create a “universal language” that would be meaningful to an independently evolved civilization? To help answer these questions, on November 10-11 the SETI Institute will convene a multidisciplinary, international workshop at its headquarters in Mountain View, California. Speakers from six countries will draw on disciplines ranging from astronomy and mathematics, to anthropology and linguistics, as they debate the best ways to create meaningful messages. While the two-day workshop is closed to the public, all talks will later be posted on the SETI Institute’s Youtube channel.

SETI Institute: Communicating Across the Cosmos Final Summary

For over a half century, astronomers involved in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have scanned the skies for signals from distant civilizations. Would humans be able to decode information-rich signals from another planet? Could we create a “universal language” that would be meaningful to an independently evolved civilization.

iWhile the two-day workshop was closed to the public, all talks were posted on the SETI Institute’s Youtube channel. On the day following the workshop, several of the speakers summarized the key ideas discussed as part of the SETI Institute’s public weekly colloquium series, held on November 12, at 12:00 noon.

NASA History Program Office’s Quarterly Newsletter: Second Quarter 2013

nasa-history-office-report-capovaThe NASA History Program Office’s Quarterly Notes & News published in 2013, Volume 30, Number 2.

The Sound of Space workshop report ‘The Sonic Dimension of Outer Space, 1940–1980’ including a note about my presentation is available from the News & Notes: the NASA History Program Office’s Quarterly Newsletter.

International Committee for the History of Technology reports on “Sounds of Space”

Newsletter of the International Committee for the History of Technology (ICOHTEC) reports on the Sounds of Space workshop organized by William R. Macauley and the Emmy Noether Research Group “The Future in the Stars: European Astroculture and Extraterrestrial Life in the Twentieth Century.” The workshop gathered more than two dozen scholars at Freie Universität Berlin in late November 2012. It set out to investigate how outer space was sonically imagined between the late 1940s and 1980. Broadening academic work on astroculture – hitherto focused on visual aspects – into another sensorial dimension was the main objective.

Read and/or download the ICOHTEC Newsletter, No 98, June 2013.

Report to the IAA on the 5th “Search for Life Signatures” symposium held at UNESCO

Report to the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on the 5th “Search for Life Signatures” symposium held at UNESCO in Paris was written by Dr. Claudio Maccone IAA (Director for Scientific Space Exploration and Chair, IAA SETI Permanent Committee); the report is now available to download (PDF).